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If you ever had any doubt about where Steve Earle's musical roots are planted, his new collection, So You Wannabe an Outlaw, makes it perfectly plain. "There's nothing ‘retro' about this record," he states, "I'm just acknowledging where I'm coming from." So You Wannabe an Outlaw is the first recording he has made in Austin, TS. Earle has lived in New York City for the past decade but he acknowledges, "Look, I'm always gonna be a Texan, no matter what I do. And I'm always going to be somebody who learned their craft in Nashville. It's who I am." So You Wannabe an Outlaw is an homage to outlaw music. "I was out to unapologetically ‘channel' Waylon as best as I could." says Earle. "...Waylon's Honky Tonk Heroes was the template for the new album. And I've always considered that record to be really important. I consider his Honky Tonk Heroes the Exile on Main Street of country music." So You Want To Be An Outlaw is dedicated to Jennings, who died in 2002. The vinyl version of the album include Earle's remakes of the timeless Waylon anthem "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way," as well as Billy Joe Shaver's "Ain't No God in Mexico," which Jennings popularized as well as Earle's versions of "Sister's Coming Home" and "The Local Memory," songs that first appeared on Willie Nelson albums. The new songs include the gentle, acoustic folk ballads "News From Colorado" and "The Girl on the Mountain." "Fixin' to Die," on the other hand, is a dark shout from the hell of Death Row. "The Firebreak Line" returns Earle to his pile-driving, country-rock roots. "You Broke My Heart" is a sweet, simple salute to the 1950s sounds of Webb Pierce or Carl Smith. "Walkin' in L.A." is a twanging country shuffle. The guitar-heavy "Sunset Highway" is an instant-classic escape song. And the deeply touching "Goodbye Michelangelo" is Earle's farewell to his mentor, Guy Clark, who passed away last year. Earle is backed on the new album by his long time band The Dukes (guitarist Chris Masterson, fiddle player Eleanor Whitmore, bassist Kelly Looney, and new members drummer Brad Pemberton and pedal steel player Ricky Ray Jackson). Willie Nelson, Johnny Bush, and Miranda Lambert also make guest appearances.

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